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Florida Hospitals Go Red for Women

FLAGLER & VOLUSIA COUNTY, February 10, 2014 – For nearly 100 years, cardiovascular disease has caused more deaths in the U.S. than any other cause.

The good news is that within the past 40 years, there has been a striking reduction in coronary heart disease deaths in men; the bad news is that reductions in women have lagged behind.

Since 1984, more women than men have died each year from heart disease. Among women, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. While one in 31 American women dies from breast cancer each year, one in three dies of heart disease. The fact is, heart disease kills approximately one woman every minute.

That’s why the Florida Hospitals in Volusia and Flagler counties joined thousands across the nation in support of the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Day on February 7 and hosted a variety of events.

At Florida Hospital DeLand, approximately 100 people joined the hospital for a free heart-healthy breakfast and health fair, as well as tours of the cardiac areas and GE cardiac catheterization labs. Additionally, 66 individuals received free heart disease screenings, including blood work, to learn their risk of cardiac disease. The hospital also hosted a lunch for cardiac disease survivors with Dr. Michel Vandormael, Florida Hospital DeLand interventional cardiologist.

At Florida Hospital Fish Memorial in Orange City, approximately 70 people joined the hospital for a free heart-healthy breakfast and health fair, as well as tours of the cardiac areas and cardiac catheterization labs. Additionally, 55 individuals received free heart disease screenings, including blood work, to learn their risk of cardiac disease. At Macy’s at the Seminole Towne Center in Sanford, 200 guests attended a Foundation Go Red event where they enjoyed a grab-and-go lunch, learned to do exercises at the work place and donated funds to the Florida Hospital Fish Memorial’s cardiopulmonary rehab department to benefit the local underserved population.

At Florida Hospital Flagler in Palm Coast, approximately 100 women - and a few men - came to the hospital to hear to Dr. Thomas Joiner, board certified interventional cardiologist, speak about women and heart disease. While attendees enjoyed a heart-healthy breakfast of egg sandwiches on whole wheat English muffins, with oatmeal and fruit, Dr. Joiner spoke about the various risk factors of heart disease, as well as the signs and symptoms of both heart disease and heart attacks. He also discussed some of the differences between men and women’s hearts and heart attacks signs, and the latest technology in treatments.

At Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center in Daytona Beach, approximately 50 people received free heart disease screenings, a heart-healthy breakfast and tours of the cardiac catheterization lab. 

About Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler
Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler is a member of the Adventist Health System, the nation’s largest not-for-profit Protestant healthcare provider with a mission to extend the healing ministry of Christ. Founded in 1973, Adventist Health System has grown to become the largest not-for-profit Protestant healthcare provider in the nation, operating 45 hospital campuses within 10 states, employing over 70,000 individuals, and providing care for more than 4 million patients each year.

With five hospitals in Volusia and Flagler counties, Florida Hospital is the largest hospital system in the area, with 788 beds, 4,900 employees, and 650,000 patients every year. In 2013, Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler collectively contributed nearly $104 million in benefits to the underprivileged, the community’s overall health and wellness and spiritual needs, and capital improvements.

Photo Caption:
In support of the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Day, Florida Hospital Fish Memorial in Orange City hosted free heart disease screenings, as well as a heart-healthy breakfast and health fair, including tours of the cardiac areas and cardiac catheterization labs.